Tag Archives: drilling wastewater

WV Sierra Club Announces Lineup of Speakers for Marcellus Academy III

Dr. Ben Stout,  Charlotte Pritt,   Prof. Michael McCawley,   WV DEP Officials,   Prof. Alan Collins

Headlining a Weekend of Presentations and Workshops on Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling

 At WV Wesleyan College, Buckhannon, WV on July 13-14, 2013

Dr. Ben Stout, Professor of Biology at Wheeling Jesuit Universitywill speak on the mounting problems with toxic drilling waste and the proposed Wheeling wastewater facility

Mike McCawley, School of Public Health at WVU is in charge of measuring air pollution effects from Marcellus drilling for a legislatively mandated DEP study due this July.

Charlotte Pritt, former State Senator and environmental advocate: The WV Legislature – Who’s Who and How It Works.

Alan CollinsProfessor and Assistant Director, Division of Resource Management at WVU will speak on “Split Estates and Surface Owner Perceptions of Shale Gas Drilling”. 

Gene Smith, WV Dept. of Environmental Protection’s Assistant Chief-Permitting and Rick Campbell, Inspector Supervisor, will discuss aspects of their agency’s role in gas drilling.

·        A Panel of Experts on Community Organizing and Planning will cover organizing local watershed groups, forming grassroots groups that can monitor industry activity, creating official Marcellus Gas Study Committees within your county commission, and creating land use planning for county commissions to use as a model for home rule

·        Diane Pitcock’s West Virginia Host Farms Program, linking WV landowners with media and the environmental community to illustrate the impact of Marcellus shale gas drilling

·        Bill Hughes’ primer on all those big trucks: what are they, what do they do?  What drilling phase is happening when certain trucks and equipment arrive at a well site?

·        Beth Little’s history of violations at the underground injection well in Lochgelly, WV and what that says about the WV UIC program

·        George Monk: Citizen Gas Well Monitoring Project; learning to monitor wells in your area: “Digging deeper, using publicly available databases and FOIA requests.”

·        Cindy Rank’s Tall Trees Marcellus Well Site Description, photos and briefing in preparation for….

·        A Field Trip to a nearby Marcellus gas drilling site: up close and personal

·        An Open Session for guest videos, slide shows and personal stories

Marcellus Academy III is less than a month away. If you haven’t registered yet, what are you waiting for?

This jam packed weekend is an educational opportunity for activists who will proactively work on Marcellus gas drilling issues in their communities. Because the surge in industrial scale drilling sites is causing such major problems with our water, our land, our air and our health, it has become crucial to quickly build citizen awareness of the inherent dangers. This program will focus on giving you the tools to effectively organize others, build grassroots networks of reporters who can monitor industry practices, and help guide local leaders toward environmentally sound Marcellus policies.

This is not an introductory course on how Marcellus drilling works. Emphasis will be on education, outreach and activism. Participants will be limited to those who can clearly commit to organizing people on their home turf by having meetings, giving presentations, organizing house parties and speaking out to build public awareness. The goal? Empower more everyday citizens to take the initiative in protecting their communities.

Marcellus Academy III is cost-free, user-friendly, informal and friendly. Previous Marcellus Academy graduates are encouraged to attend. There’s plenty of new information out there. Applicants are not required to be affiliated with any particular environmental organization.

Only a limited number of registrations will be accepted. Applicants will be considered based primarily on geographical region, resulting in new organizers in as many regions as possible. We do hope to see more than one person from a community, so they can work as a team, but the number will depend on applications from the rest of the state. All of your expenses for the workshop (lodging, meals, and mileage) will be covered by WV Sierra Club. Our program will run from 9:30AM Saturday until 3:30PM Sunday.

Space is limited, so please apply as soon as possible by sending your name, address, county, and phone number to outreach@marcellus-wv.com. If you can’t come, but know somebody in your community who fits our guidelines, please let us know. Again, they should be folks who can make a clear commitment to do what it takes to build local grassroots action on their home turf.

Help create a strong, intelligent response to the challenge of Marcellus drilling. Register now.

Thank you.

Chuck Wyrostok, Sierra Club Outreach Organizer

Toll free 877 252 0257

www.marcellus-wv.com

Drilling Wastewater Released to Streams, Some Unaccounted For

Source : ProPublica | by Nicholas Kusnetz | Jan. 5, 2011, 9:20 a.m.

The McKeesport Sewage Treatment Plant, one of nine plants on the Monongahela River that has treated wastewater from Marcellus Shale drilling operations. (Joaquin Sapien/ProPublica)

As gas-drilling operations proliferated in Pennsylvania’s Marcellus Shale over the past couple of years, most of the hundreds of millions of gallons of briny wastewater they produced was eventually dumped into the state’s rivers. Much of the rest is unaccounted for. That news, from a detailed look at the state’s management of drilling wastewater by the Associated Press, should come as no surprise to readers of this site.

As we reported in October 2009, Pennsylvania was largely unprepared for the vast quantities of salty, chemically tainted wastewater produced by drilling operations in the Marcellus, the gas-bearing shale formation that stretches under that state and into West Virginia, New York and Ohio. While the state Department of Environmental Protection called for the fluids to be sent through municipal treatment plants, those facilities are largely unable to remove the salts and minerals, also known as Total Dissolved Solids (TDS), from the waste.

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